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  • Wednesday, July 12, 2017 at 11:00 AM through October 10, 2017

    Tell FERC to Stop the Pacific Connector Pipeline!

    Comment to FERC on the Pacific Connector Pipeline Today!

    FERC, the Federal agency responsible for permitting Jordan Cove LNG, has opened an ongoing comment period to collect scoping comments on the Jordan Cove LNG project and Pacific Connector Pipeline.

    “Scoping” is the process where FERC will decide what is included in the environmental impact statement and what issues to focus on. The scoping period is when the public and state agencies get to look through the impact studies the company has submitted and suggest other necessary impacts we want FERC to consider.

    Now we need you to submit comments about what FERC should include in the Environmental Impact Study to ensure we get the most thorough review possible. 

    Writing a comment to FERC is Easy. Here's how:

    1) Write your comments  and save them as a word doc or PDF on your computer (up to 6,000 words). In your own words, let FERC know that:

    • FERC must not rely on outdated data from previous iterations of the Jordan Cove and Pacific Connector projects, including wildlife or plant surveys that may no longer reflect on-the-ground conditions.

    • FERC must consider alternatives to the project as a whole. FERC must also consider alternative designs to avoid potential impacts from the project.

    • FERC must spell out specific mitigation measures and plans that are relied upon to draw conclusions about the impacts of the projects.

    • FERC should weigh heavily the negative impacts on private landowners of the Pacific Connector, which would harm private property rights though the potential use of eminent domain.

    • FERC should address the full impacts of the projects on water quality for each stream and wetland impacted. FERC should require Pacific Connector to rely on up-to-date and site-specific information to evaluate the impacts of the proposals.

    • FERC should consider the direct, indirect and cumulative impacts to fish and wildlife that will be impacted by the proposed LNG terminal and pipeline, including threatened and endangered salmon, steelhead, and wildlife.

    • FERC must consider the climate-changing pollution that would be generated by all aspects of this project. FERC must consider the direct, indirect, and cumulative impact of fracked and conventional gas production, transport, liquefaction, and end use, including the contribution of leaked methane gas to the overall carbon pollution from these proposals.

    • FERC must undertake a detailed analysis of the public safety risks associated with the terminal and pipeline. In past reviews, FERC has failed to adequately address fire and emergency response risks along the pipeline route. Further, FERC must take a realistic look at a worst-case LNG spill and fire near the terminal.

    • FERC should consider an alternative pipeline route around any family who objects to the pipeline being buried on their property. Eminent domain should never be used for the private corporate profits

    • FERC should consider damages to families and farms along the route. With Pacific Connector staff freely operating up and down the pipeline route for building, monitoring, inspection and brush clearing, families lose the personal privacy and sense of security they have in their homes, FERC must consider this loss of privacy.

    • FERC must consider whether fair compensation is even possible when granting the power of eminent domain to a multi-national. Just knowing that FERC will likely give them the right of eminent domain to take property by force helps the corporations abuse fair compensation.

    • FERC must consider the negative impacts of pushing 1/3rd more gas, with 1/3rd higher pressure through rural Oregon with frequent wildland fire. Parts of the pipeline are above ground in the block valves. So far, FERC has no plans to protect these above-ground sections of pipe in rural areas from wildland fire.

    • FERC must consider the impacts of the proposed 1/3rd more gas shipped which includes 1/3rd more ship traffic and marine impacts.

    • FERC should consider the safety impacts to rural families along the pipeline route under a class 1 pipeline safety standard.

    • FERC must consider the impacts of large populations of temporary work force along the pipeline route and in Coos Bay for the LNG terminal. History has shown that increases in drug and alcohol use, crime, prostitution, domestic violence and other negative activities occur in communities where large outside work force move in.

    • FERC must consider the impacts of putting a highly explosive LNG export plant in a subduction earthquake zone and a tsunami evacuation area. FERC must get an unbiased peer-review of the proposed earthquake mitigations from scientists familiar with our unique coastal Oregon situation.

    • FERC should give more notice for public hearings. FERC only gave 2 weeks notice for scoping hearings held in Coos, Douglas and Klamath counties. Many rural Oregonians lack access to internet making public meetings a key peice of collecting public input. FERC should also offer scoping hearing in Jackson county which they neglected to provide. 

    2) After you have written your comments Go to https://ferconline.ferc.gov/QuickComment.aspx and fill out the form. You will be sent a link to comment on a new page.

    3) Go to your email and click the link from FERC. In the new page, enter docket number PF17-4 (no spaces) and hit “search”. Select the Jordan Cove docket by clicking the blue "select" cross.

    4) Copy and paste your comments from your word document into the textbox and hit “Send comment”.

    5) You are done! Thanks and please help spread the word!

     

     

     

  • Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 06:00 PM through October 04, 2017

    Submit Comments on Dredging in Coos Bay

     

    Even though we’ve defeated the proposed PCPL Pipeline and Jordan Cove LNG Export project twice, Veresen is trying for round 3 and submitted their official project application to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission last week. FERC will likely accept their application as complete in the next week which will kick off a number of state and federal permitting processes and opportunities for action.


    You can help take action to stop the PCPL fracked gas pipeline and LNG export project now by  submitting comments to the Army Corps of Engineers about dredging in Coos bay. The Port of Coos Bay is seeking permits to significantly deepen and widen the bay for facilitating export projects including (if not exclusively) Jordan Cove LNG. The project would be funded in part by $60 million state grant, meaning taxpayers would foot the bill for a project that would largely benefit a Canadian corporation.

    Here's some more information on how to submit comments and some helpful talking points that you can raise. Comments are due no later than Tuesday October 3rd, 2017.

    Talking Points for Writing Comments to the Army Corps on the Port of Coos Bay Dredging Project

    Background: The U.S Army Corps of Engineers is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to analyze the potential environmental effects of approving a major dredging project on the Bay. The project proposes to widen and deepen the Coos Bay Federal Navigation

    Project from the ocean to river mile (RM) 8.2 to so that large tankers can fit in the bay to transport the LNG overseas. The Army Corps is looking for comments on what issues to cover in their Environmental impact Statement. We can raise issues on everything ranging from navigation concerns, socio-economics, fish and wildlife, water quality, safety, shoreline erosion and accretion, recreation, and cultural and historic resources and more. Scoping comments will also be used to develop possible project alternatives.

    Submitting Comments: All interested parties are invited to submit written comments on or before October 3, 2017 to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (PM-E), P. O. Box 2946, Portland, OR 97208-2946, or by email at coosbaychannelmodEIS@usace.army.mil. All comments should include “Coos Bay Channel Modification Project EIS”

     

    1. Project purpose: The Public Notice for dredging does not state the reasoning for channel modification (e.g. they don’t say it’s for Jordan Cove even though it’s pretty clear the project would almost exclusively benefit that project)

    • In the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS), the Corps must demonstrate why it is necessary to widen and deepen the channel, and whether that purpose can be met without modifying the Coos Bay Federal Navigation Channel. This should also include evaluation of the types and numbers of shipping projected for Coos Bay.

    • The Corps has not stated a clear purpose for the widening and deepening of the Coos Bay Federal Navigation Channel.

    • The US Army Corps of Engineers must clarify purpose of the dredging request

    2) This is a connected action to the Jordan Cove LNG Export Project

    • There is a very similar proposal to dredge the channel, dispose the dredged material offshore, and increase access for ship traffic for the Jordan Cove LNG Export Project.

    • The Corps should do a full review of the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of modifying the channel and disposing of the dredged material offshore in the context of the proposed LNG terminal and Pacific Connector Pipeline as a connected action.

    3) Public Trust: This impacts our public trust right of fishing, access, and water use.

    • Being able to use and access waters for fishing is one of our most basic public trust rights in Oregon (According to the case: Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition v. Oregon Fish and Wildlife Comm’n, 62 Or App 481, 493 (1983))

    • Modifying the channel will have significant impacts to fishing and shellfishing areas within Coos Bay. This would negatively impact the economic value of fisheries in the area.

    • Modifying the channel may interfere with the ability of the public to access these areas for fishing and other general water uses. This would negatively impact the outdoor recreation industry in the area.

     

    4) Extent and Impact of Channel Deepening: EIS should consider the direct, indirect and cumulative impacts to the estuary

    • The proposed dredging and disposal associated with the channel modification will likely cause direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts to the estuary, including impacts to fish and wildlife, vegetation, water quality, geomorphology, and tsunami risk.

    • The EIS needs to consider the direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of the proposed dredging:

      • The EIS should consider how widening and deepening the channel could change tidal dynamics, alter the bottom of the estuary which is important habitat, and increase tsunami hazard.

      • The EIS should consider impacts to water quality from dredging and disposal, including but not limited to dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, fecal coliform, and sediment contaminants.

      • Since the dredging could destroy important habitat for fish, oysters, clams the EIS should consider the biological impacts, including but not limited to benthic organisms, fish, marine mammals, and invasive species.

    • The Corps should determine whether this project has the potential to violate the Oregon water quality standards for dissolved oxygen and sediment.

     

    5) Coastal Zone Management Act: The State of Oregon must be allowed to determine   if the project complies with the Coastal Zone Management Act.

    • The Department of Land Conservation and Development has the authority to review federal permits that require federal consistency review.

    • The Corps cannot issue any permit until the State of Oregon determines if this proposed project is consistent with the Oregon Coastal Zone Management Act.

    • The EIS and Department of State Land Conservation and Development have to demonstrate that the proposed project is in compliance with Statewide Planning Goals, city and county land use plans, and state policies for water quality, removal-fill, fish and wildlife.

    • The Corps should consider their compliance with the Oregon Coastal Zone Management Act by evaluating:

      • Impacts to coastal shorelines, estuaries and dunes under Statewide Planning Goals 16, 17, and 18,

      • Impacts related to natural hazards under Statewide Planning Goal 7,

      • Impacts to natural resources, air, and water under Statewide Planning Goal 5 and 6,

      • And requirements of state statutes and regulations about removal-fill, water quality, and fish and wildlife protections.

    6) Socioeconomic factors

    • What impacts will dredging have to fishing, crabbing and oyster industries in the bay?

    • How will the project impact travel related to fishing, recreation and tourism?

    7) Who Pays?

    • Will the Port of Coos Bay be using public, taxpayer funds to develop the project? If so, how much of the total cost is projected to be paid for by private companies.

    • What companies stand to benefit the most from the project? What companies stand to be negatively impacted?

    8) Climate Impacts

    • The Corps should consider the how widening the channel may increase traffic from large tankers and the climate impacts of increased traffic in the bay.

    9) Alternatives

    • The Corps should rigorously explore and objectively evaluate all reasonable alternatives, and for alternatives which were eliminated from detailed study, briefly discuss the reasons for their having been eliminated.

    • Devote substantial treatment to each alternative considered in detail including the proposed action so that reviewers may evaluate their comparative merits.

    • Include reasonable alternatives not within the jurisdiction of the lead agency.

    • Include the alternative of no action

  • Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 06:00 PM · 1 rsvp
    Eagle Point Library

    Energize Rogue: Eagle Point

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    Do you want to make your home or business more energy efficient? Have you been considering an upgrade from an older, expensive heating and cooling system?

    Energize Rogue is a unique, limited-time opportunity to purchase a ductless heat pump at a discounted rate through a community group-purchasing program, and reduce energy use by 25-50% over traditional heating and cooling systems.

    In addition to a discounted purchase price and lower long-term utility bills, Pacific Power customers may qualify for $800 - $1,000 in cash rebates through the Energy Trust of Oregon, if upgrading from another electric heat source. Residential customers may also qualify for state tax credits.

    Attend a free, 1-hour workshop to qualify. Learn about ductless heat pumps, energy and cost savings associated with the technology, and eligibility for cash rebates and tax credits.

    The first of two Jackson County workshops this Fall will take place at the Eagle Point Library, Wednesday, September 27, 6:00-7:00 PM. It is open to all Jackson County homeowners and businesses.

    This project is made possible by a USDA Rural Business Development Grant to support our region in growing a clean energy economy.

    Register in advance online: http://energizerogue.org/ or call 541.236.5027. Free admission.

  • Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at 05:00 PM

    Energize Rogue: Medford 5pm

    energize_rogue_facebook_rectangle.jpg

    Do you want to make your home or business more energy efficient? Have you been considering an upgrade from an older, expensive heating and cooling system?

    Energize Rogue is a unique, limited-time opportunity to purchase a ductless heat pump at a discounted rate through a community group-purchasing program, and reduce energy use by 25-50% over traditional heating and cooling systems.

    In addition to a discounted purchase price and lower long-term utility bills, Pacific Power customers may qualify for $800 - $1,000 in cash rebates through the Energy Trust of Oregon, if upgrading from another electric heat source. Residential customers may also qualify for state tax credits.

    Attend a free, 1-hour workshop to qualify. Learn about ductless heat pumps, energy and cost savings associated with the technology, and eligibility for cash rebates and tax credits.

    The second of two Jackson County workshops this Fall will take place at the RCC Higher Education Center in Medford on Wednesday, October 25 from 5:00-6:00 PM and from 7:00pm-8:00pm. It is open to all Jackson County homeowners and businesses.

    This project is made possible by a USDA Rural Business Development Grant to support our region in growing a clean energy economy.

    Register in advance online: http://energizerogue.org/ or call 541.236.5027. Free admission.

  • Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at 07:00 PM

    Energize Rogue: Medford 7pm

    energize_rogue_facebook_rectangle.jpg

    Do you want to make your home or business more energy efficient? Have you been considering an upgrade from an older, expensive heating and cooling system?

    Energize Rogue is a unique, limited-time opportunity to purchase a ductless heat pump at a discounted rate through a community group-purchasing program, and reduce energy use by 25-50% over traditional heating and cooling systems.

    In addition to a discounted purchase price and lower long-term utility bills, Pacific Power customers may qualify for $800 - $1,000 in cash rebates through the Energy Trust of Oregon, if upgrading from another electric heat source. Residential customers may also qualify for state tax credits.

    Attend a free, 1-hour workshop to qualify. Learn about ductless heat pumps, energy and cost savings associated with the technology, and eligibility for cash rebates and tax credits.

    The second of two Jackson County workshops this Fall will take place at the RCC Higher Education Center Building in Medford on, Wednesday, October 25 from 5:00-6:00 PM with an identical presentation from 7:00-8:00 PM. It is open to all Jackson County homeowners and businesses.

    This project is made possible by a USDA Rural Business Development Grant to support our region in growing a clean energy economy.

    Register in advance online: http://energizerogue.org/ or call 541.236.5027. Free admission.


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